Know Your Target and What Is Beyond It

//ADDED on 04/08/2018 // Since few people are reading are second post about the incident that attempted to counter accusations that the original post is “fake news.” Here is a photo of the 50-caliber bullet after it was removed from the wall:

 


 

The other day a man in Marion violated the following cardinal firearms safety rule: “KNOW YOUR TARGET AND WHAT IS BEYOND IT.” While shooting a 50-caliber rifle for target practice, he unintentionally shot a round into the home of one of our firefighters. After missing the shooter’s makeshift target, the large round flew for a mile through the woods before puncturing through exterior and interior walls of our firefighter’s home. Our firefighter and his wife were at home when this happened. Thankfully, the weren’t injured, but they were justifiably scared and angered when they called 9-1-1. The shooter was identified and has agreed to pay for repairs to the home.

Not that it feels like it today, but spring is here and will feature hunters and target shooters out in the woods. Whether you’re a hunter wanting to sight your rifle before the season opens next week on black bears, or you’re out for some fun plinking, don’t go traipsing off into the woods thinking you can set up a target anywhere you like under the mistaken belief that the area is so underpopulated that, if you miss the target, the odds of being anything more than embarrassed are low. There are homes hidden by trees and folks out hiking with their dogs. Hunters and target shooters, be aware and cautious!

The rifle round that penetrated our firefighter’s home.

12 thoughts on “Know Your Target and What Is Beyond It

  1. Why does it look like the round is still in its casing? Please tell me this isn’t Fake News to drum up gun control.

    Like

    1. No, this isn’t “Fake News” nor is it an attempt to “drum up gun control.” At no point did we decry guns, only the incautious use of them. We simply want to prevent a potential future accident in our district. As for your claim that the bullet’s case can be seen in the picture, the line seen at the base of round’s point in the picture is not the top of a case for the bullet, but an indentation in the bullet created at the neck of the case when the bullet was fired. We’ll soon post a picture of the recovered bullet to illustrate that fact.

      Like

  2. This is a straight up lie. The projectile is still in the casing in your picture. Utter anti-gun nonsense.

    Like

    1. How insulting. Since when did promoting responsible gun use equate to “anti-gun nonsense”? At no point did we decry guns, only the incautious use of them. We simply want to prevent a potential future accident. As for your claim that the bullet’s case can be seen in the picture, the line seen at the base of round’s point in the picture is not the top of a case for the bullet, but an indentation in the bullet created at the neck of the case when the bullet was fired. We’ll soon post a picture of the recovered bullet to illustrate that fact.

      Like

  3. Good post. Great reminder to put safety first. To the experienced eye it is clear there is no brass attached to the bullet, only the crimp mark from the brass. It is also very common for a bullet to remain intact when impacting soft material (e.g. pine, paper, loose soil, drywall, etc.) particularly a heavy bullet such as this.
    Thanks for sharing this information!
    FYI – I am a staunch supporter of our 2nd Amendment, Life Member of the NRA, avid shooter, CCW holder, and I carry all the time.
    To those out there trying to disparage a concerned member of the community – give it a break already. She is one of the most competent people I know with a gun in her hand, and strong supporter of our rights. She simply wants us to be safe in our pursuits.

    Like

  4. My first impression was that the projectile was still in the cartridge case but on closer examination that is what is called the cannelure. This is a groove made in the projectile around the circumference so that the mouth of the cartridge case can be crimped into the cannelure in order to better hold the projectile such that it cannot be shaken loose during handling/feeding/etc.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s